Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid: Are They Different?

Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid: Are They Different?

Trevor A Mori, Ph.D., Professor, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Many of the cardiovascular benefits ascribed to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids were initially attributed to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) rather than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It was suggested that some of the effects of EPA were due to its being a competitive inhibitor of arachidonic acid for the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes, leading to prostaglandins and leukotrienes with attenuated bioactivity compared with the respective arachidonic acid analogues. However, we now know that…

Read More

Improving the Response Rate in Migraine Headache Attacks

This article at a glance This study addressed the potential effectiveness of daily EPA/DHA for migraine headaches in adults with chronic migraine also taking low-dose amitriptyline, a drug used for migraine prevention. Participants taking both EPA/DHA and amitriptyline for 2 months reported a major reduction in the frequency of headache attacks. The results of this study warrant new studies to confirm the significant effect of the EPA/DHA intervention.   Migraine is one of the most common disorders of the central nervous system. Migraine manifests most typically as recurrent headaches that…

Read More