DHA-Supplemented Term Infants Score Higher in Gesture Communication

Many studies of infant development have reported improved visual, cognitive and neurodevelopmental scores in infants with higher consumption of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Improvements have been easier to demonstrate in preterm infants compared with term infants because of the nutrient shortages many preterm infants have. However, not all studies have observed improved development scores,

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Learning and Behavior in Adolescents Whose Mothers Ate Fish During Pregnancy

[frame src=”/wp-content/uploads/images/FOL4.12_Callout2.png” alt=”” width=”175″ height=”177″ align=”right”]Persistent worries about the potential dangers from consuming fish and the methylmercury they contain continue to frighten women away from eating fish during pregnancy, especially in the U.S. Mercury is present in nearly all seafood in the form of methylmercury. Seafood consumption is already very low in the U.S. and

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Preterm Infants Fed Fish Oil May Have Less Eye Disease

One of the conditions that preterm infants risk is abnormal retinal development (retinopathy). The chances are greater in infants weighing less than 1,250 grams (2 lb 12 oz) at birth. This disorder results from the abnormal development of blood vessels in the retina. Blood vessel growth requires long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially DHA, a

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Infants with Higher Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Have Fewer Illnesses

It is well known that infants born before term have a greater likelihood of developing illnesses and developing more slowly; the earlier the birth, the greater the health risks. There is growing evidence that preterm infants provided with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from breast milk or special infant formula have improved neurodevelopmental outcomes, such

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